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Всего публикаций в данном разделе: 22213

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Arthur L. Stinchcombe American Journal of Sociology. 1961.  Vol. 67. No. 2. P. 165-176. 
Property is far more important in rural stratification than in urban stratification, where occupational position predominates. There is less similarity of the property systems in commercialized agriculture than there is in urban occupational structure. In agricultural production for markets, the main types of property systems are commercialized manorial systems, plantation systems, and ranching systems. Each of these produces a distinctive pattern of class relations, determining the sharpness of differences of legal privileges and style of life, and shaping the distribution of technical culture and political activity.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Seymour Martin Lipset American Sociological Review. 1959.  Vol. 24. No. 4. P. 482-501. 
A variety of evidence from many countries suggests that low status and low education predispose individuals to favor extremist, intolerant, and transvaluational forms of political and religious behavior. The evidence includes reports from surveys concerning differential attitudes among the various strata towards democratic values, including civil liberties for unpopular political groups, civil rights for ethnic minorities, legitimacy of opposition, and proper limits on the power of national political leaders; psychological research on the personality traits of different strata; data on the composition and appeal of chiliastic religious sects; and materials bearing on the support of authoritarian movements. The factors operating to support this predisposition are all those which make for a lack of "sophistication," a complex view of causal relations, and heightened insecurity, both objective and subjective. These findings suggest that the success of the Communist Party among those of low status in poorer nations is positively related to its authoritarian character.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Thomas Ely Lasswell American Journal of Sociology. 1959.  Vol. 64. No. 5. P. 505-508. 
Descriptions of the patterns of social stratification of the home towns of 151 subjects were sorted according to the local populations of 1950. The subjects' conceptions of social classes were shown to vary with the size of the communities; certain marked distinctions in the number of classes were believed to exist in the communities, and, even though the same values seemed to be involved, their relative importance, as indicated by frequency in being mentioned, varied significatly among the categories of communities.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Milton M. Gordon American Journal of Sociology. 1951.  Vol. 55. No. 3. P. 262-268. 
Despite the rapid development of social-class analysis within the last twenty-five years in American sociology, there is no agreement on the meaning of the term as a research tool. A series of analytical questions to be used in a survey of recent class materials is proposed to aid in the discovering of common ground. These questions revolve around definition, which may be in terms of economic power, status ascription, group life, cultural attributes, political power, or their combination; ascertainment, or class placement; defferences; social mobility; and the relationship of class to ethnic stratification.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Melvin L. Kohn American Sociological Review. 1959.  Vol. 24. No. 3. P. 352-366. 
The conditions under which middle- and working-class parents punish their pre-adolescent children physically, or refrain from doing so, appear to be quite different. Working-class parents are more likely to respond in terms of the immediate consequences of the child's actions, middle-class parents in terms of their interpretation of the child's intent in acting as he does. This reflects differences in parents' values: Working-class parents value for their children qualities that assure respectability; desirable behavior consists essentially of not violating proscriptions. Middle-class parents value the child's development of internalized standards of conduct; desirable behavior consists essentially of acting according to the dictates of one's own principles. The first necessarily focuses on the act itself, the second on the actor's intent.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Melvin L. Kohn American Journal of Sociology. 1959.  Vol. 64. No. 4. P. 337-351. 
Middle-and working-class parents share a broadly common se of values-but not an identical set by any means. There appears to be a close fit between the actual workings-class situation and the values of working-class parents; between the actual middle-class situation and the values of middle-class parents. In either situation the values that seem important but problematic are the ones most likely to be accorded high priority. For the working class the "important but problematic" centers around qualities that assure respectability; for the middle class it centers around internalized standards of conduct.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Karl O'Lessker American Journal of Sociology. 1969.  Vol. 74. No. 1. P. 63-69. 
No agreement yet exists among social scientists as to sources of naziism's sudden electoral surge in 1930 and 1932. One widely held view, stressing the importance of the "outcast and apathetic," has been sharply challenged by S. M. Lipset, who argues that electoral support for Hitler was essentially a middle-class phenomenon. But on the basis of a new analysis of the voting returns, I conclude that a combination of former non-voters and traditional Rightists gave naziism its first great success, and the bulk of the middle-class vote went to Hitler only after the Nazis had established themselves as the largest non-Marxist party in Germany.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Richard F. Hamilton American Sociological Review. 1966.  Vol. 31. No. 2. P. 192-199. 
A test of claims made about white-collar workers shows the following: about half identify themselves as "working-class." Those identifying themselves as middle-class are not marginal; the working-class identifiers are the ones who have low incomes. Working-class identifiers report working-class origins and middle-class identifiers indicate middle-class origins. "Authoritarianism" is not especially prevalent among the clerical workers who are economically marginal. Some comparative materials are examined and alternative lines of theory indicated.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Joel I. Nelson American Journal of Sociology. 1968.  Vol. 74. No. 2. P. 184-192. 
Research is reported on the relation between anomie and membership in the old and the new middle class. The old and the new middle class are defined in terms of two dimensions: (1) access to large-scale industrial bureaucracies-a factor relevant to mass-society theory-and (2) ownership as opposed to management of capital-a factor relevant to a more traditional class-oriented, economic theory. The data are generally more consistent with an economic viewpoint than a mass-society viewpoint: at low and moderate income levels owners tend to be more anomic than managers; bureaucratic affiliations are not, however, related to anomie. An attempt is made to trace the differences in anomie between owners and managers to varying mobility commitments. Owners tend to be less mobility oriented than managers. When commitments to mobility are controlled, the differences on anomie between the two groups attenuate to a point where they are no longer statistically significant. This result is discussed within a more general theoretical perspective.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Maurice Zeitlin American Journal of Sociology. 1966.  Vol. 71. No. 5. P. 493-508. 
Cuba has been characterized by abrupt political and social transitions, and Cubans have interpreted their history to a significant extent in generational terms. This study is based on interviews with 202 Cuban industrial workers. Hypotheses were formulated in accordance with the concept of political generation. Each political generation, both in the aggregate and in structural (employment-status) subgroups, had prerevolutionary attitudes toward the Communists and has responded to the Castro revolution as predicted from knowledge of the historical experiences hypothesized to have been of decisive political relevance in the formation of that generation.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Bertell Ollman American Journal of Sociology. 2002.  Vol. 73. No. 5. P. 573-580. 
We attempt to derive Marx's theory of class through the way he uses the terms, rather than through an interpretation of his most general statements on the subject, which is how class has usually been approached. "Class" is seen to refer to social and economic groupings based on a wide variety of standards whose interrelations are those Marx finds in the real society under examination. By conceptualizing a unity of apparently distinct social relations, "class" in Marxism is inextricably bound up with the truth of Marx's own analysis. Its utility is a function of the adequacy of this analysis.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Melvin L. Kohn American Journal of Sociology. 1963.  Vol. 68. No. 4. P. 471-480. 
The argument of this analysis is that class differences in parent-child relationships are a product of differences in parental values (with middle-class parents' values centering on self-direction and working-class parents' values on conformity to external proscriptions); these differences in values, in turn, stem from differences in the conditions of life of the various social classes (particularly occupational conditions-middle-class occupations requiring a greater degree of self-direction, working-class occupations, in larger measure, requiring that one follow explicit rules set down by someone in authority). Values, thus, form a bridge between social structure and behavior.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Murray A. Straus American Sociological Review. 1962.  Vol. 27. No. 3. P. 326-335. 
The theoretical and research literature on self-imposed postponement of gratifications or satisfactions is reviewed with emphasis on the relation of such a "Deferred Gratification Pattern" (DGP) to social class and social mobility. Three hypotheses growing out of this review were tested on 338 male high school students. The hypothesis of a deferred gratification pattern received some support from the fact that scales with reproducibilities from .92 to .96 were developed for deferment of five adolescent needs (affiliation, aggression, consumption, economic independence, and sex); and by the intercorrelation of these scales. The hypothesis of positive correlation between socioeconomic status and DGP was not supported. The hypothesis of positive correlation between the DGP scales and achievement role-performance and role-orientation was supported. These relationships were not eliminated by controls for socioeconomic status and intelligence. Findings are interpreted as supporting the theory that need deferment is functional for social mobility in American society.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Robert W. Hodge, Donald J. Treiman American Journal of Sociology. 1968.  Vol. 73. No. 5. P. 535-547. 
Data derived from a national sample survey reveal that education, main earner's occupation, and family income have independent effects upon class identification. Multiple regresion analyses reveal that ownership of stocks and bonds in private companies, savings bonds, and rental property makes no significant contribution to the explanation of class identification once education, occupation, and income have been controlled. These same socioeconomic variables also account for the zero-order associations of race and union membership with class identification. However, indexes based upon the occupational levels of one's friends, neighbors, and relatives make independent contributions to one's class identification which are no less important than those made by education, occupation, and income. Thus, class identification rests not only upon one's own location in the status structure but upon the socioeconomic level of one's acquaintances.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Michael Patrick Allen American Journal of Sociology. 1981.  Vol. 86. No. 5. P. 1112-1123. 
The research presented here investigates the relative utility of a power theory versus a functional theory of organizational stratification as they pertain to managerial compensation in the large corporation. Concretely, it examines the effects of different types and levels of corporate control, adjusted for the effects of corporate size and performance, on three dimensions of compensation among 218 industrial corporations during 1975 and 1976. In order to assess the power of the chief executive officer in relation to other directors, the analysis employs a hierarchy of control configurations based on the distribution of stock ownerwhip among the members of the board of directors. In general, the results confirm the hypothesis that the remuneration received by a chief executive officer is directly related to his power within the corporation. A major exception to this pattern involves chief executive officers who are also principal stockholders in their corporations and receive dividend income from their stock.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Kenneth I. Spenner Annual Review of Sociology. 1988.  Vol. 14. P. 69-97. 
The last decade saw considerable advances in the state of research on social stratification, work, and personality. The program carried out by Kohn, Schooler, and colleagues was central to refocusing research on social structure and personality, and generating new knowledge about social stratification, work, and personality. The review is organized around the Kohn-Schooler program and considers other research and issues in relation to this centerpiece. It includes central features and findings of the Kohn-Schooler models, replication support and extensions, scope conditions and limitations, alternate hypotheses and relationships to other explanatory models, and other forms of unattended heterogeneity. The review concludes with a summary of the ways in which the field can and should move beyond this central program; the summary is organized in terms of a research agenda at multiple levels of time and space in social structure.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Alan C. Kerckhoff Annual Review of Sociology. 1995.  Vol. 21. P. 323-347. 
This chapter reviews the current state of our knowledge about the role of institutional arrangements in stratification processes in industrial societies. The particular institutional arrangements considered are those of educational and labor force organizations. The review is organized around the Blau-Duncan basic model of status attainment and points to the need for a more elaborated conceptualization. Institutional arrangements structure the connections between social origin and educational attainment, between educational attainment and early labor force placements, and between early and later placements in the labor force. Industrial societies vary widely in the nature of these institutional arrangements, and that variation affects the patterns of movement from origins to destinations in the stratification system. Features of educational institutions considered include separation of students into specialized schools and ability groups (tracking), degree of central control, degree of autonomy, degree of stratification, and the number and specialized nature of credentials. Features of labor force institutions considered include occupational and firm-specific job classifications, internal labor markets and vacancy chains, industrial sectors and career lines. Critical aspects of the societal variation are the form of the interface between education and labor force structures and the nature of the transition from school to work. A preliminary set of hypotheses linking institutional arrangements and stratification processes is derived from this review.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Harry B. G. Ganzeboom, Donald J. Treiman, Wout C. Ultee Annual Review of Sociology. 1991.  Vol. 17. P. 277-302. 
In this article, we review 40 years of cross-national comparative research on the intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic advantage, with particular attention to developments over the past 15 years--that is, since the transition between (what have become known as) the second and third generations of social stratification and mobility research. We identify the generations by a set of core studies and categorize them with respect to data collection, measurement, analytical models, research problems, main hypotheses, and substantive results. We go on to discuss a number of new topics and approaches that have gained prominence in the research agenda in the last decade. We conclude that the field has progressed considerably with respect to data collection and measurement; that shifts across generations with respect to data analytic and modelling strategies do not unambiguously represent advances; and that with respect to problem development and theory formulation the field has become excessively narrow.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Theodore P. Gerber, Michael Hout American Journal of Sociology. 1995.  Vol. 101. No. 3. P. 611-660. 
A national survey of educational stratification in Russia reveals substantial inequality of educational attainments throughout the Soviet period. Parents' education, main earner's occupation, and geographical origin contributed to these inequalities. Gender preferences for men were removed, and for some transitions reversed. Although secondary education grew rapidly, higher education failed to keep pace. This disparity led to a university-level enrollment squeeze, and the resulting bottleneck hurt disadvantaged classes more than advantaged ones. In turn the effect of social origins on entering university increased after 1965. The upshot was no net change in the origin-based differences in likelihood of attaining a VUZ degree across three postwar cohorts.

Опубликовано на портале: 23-12-2002
Leonard Broom, Robert G. Cushing American Sociological Review. 1977.  Vol. 42. No. 1. P. 157-169. 
Two hypothesis relating responsibility, reward and performance were designed to test the Davis and Moore functional theory of stratification. Large companies in the private sector of the United States economy were selected as the source of empirical evidence to test the theory. The data base was thought to be favorable to positive findings. The responsibility variable was measured by company assets, reward was measured by total compensation of the chief executive officer, and performance was indexed by several measures of growth and profitability. Over 700 of the largest companies in the United States were grouped into sixteen relatively homogenous business activity types in order to control for (1) scarcities of qualified incumbents, (2) structural differences between industries and (3) market conditions. The results provide limited evidence of a relationship between magnitude of responsibility (functional importance) and executive compensation (reward). No support was found for a hypothesized relationship between company performance, however measured, and executive compensation. Taken as a whole, the results do not confirm the functional theory.