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Total Access: Giving Customers What They Want in an Anytime, Anywhere World (Полный доступ: предоставляя клиентам то, что они хотят – повсеместно и в любое время)

Опубликовано на портале: 31-10-2003
Изд-во: Harvard Business School Press, 2002
Тематический раздел:
Marketing as we know it is disappearing, declares industry legend Regis McKenna. Dominated by hype, and its functions increasingly automated by technology, marketing is losing control over its very reason for existing: to sustain customer relationships. The irony, says McKenna, is that even as technological advances are driving marketing into obscurity, technology is in fact marketing's only hope for regaining a prominent - even central - place in today's organizations. In this bold and visionary book, McKenna sets forth a new marketing paradigm in which machines and networks do most of the work. The obsessive emphasis on brand creation and customer manipulation gives way to a central focus on discovering individual customer preferences and integrating the people and tools to deliver them. The end goal: a networked marketing ecosystem aimed at providing a "persistent presence" to customers anytime, anywhere. To achieve this goal, marketers must become IT-centered systems integrators who engage the entire business in the process of change. And leaders must embrace a new mind-set in which marketing is everything--and everyone's responsibility. Written by the renowned "father of high-tech marketing," this rousing manifesto will remake marketing and redefine success in our networked world.

Review

The premise of this book is that the process and function of marketing are changing - in large part due to changes in technology. While it's hard to argue with that basic premise, you're likely to find yourself agreeing with some of the author's opinions about the implications of these changes and disagreeing with others. Whether you agree or disagree with McKenna's predictions for the future, you'll probably find them thought-provoking. The theme I found most compelling was that technology, along with a number of other factors, is likely to bring an end to the era in which branding dominates marketing thought.

Mary Ellen Gordon