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How would I know About the Civil Rights Movement? Assimilation and Diminishing Collective Memory of the Black Middle Class

Опубликовано на портале: 19-05-2004
Nicol E. Turner-Lee
Научный руководитель: Arthur L. Stinchcombe
2002
Организация: Northwestern University
Подтип: PhD
Тематические разделы: Социология, Экономическая социология, Экономическая социология: Социально-экономическая дифференциация. Бедность, Социальная стратификация

Aннотация:
This study addresses how African Americans who became middle class after the Civil Rights Movement shared the legacies of the Civil Rights Movement with subsequent generations. Sharing data collected from fifty-two middle class blacks


This study addresses how African Americans who became middle class after the Civil Rights Movement shared the legacies of the Civil Rights Movement with subsequent generations. Sharing data collected from fifty-two middle class blacks, this study addresses three critical questions:
(1)What was the experience of African Americans who became middle class as a result of the civil rights opportunities?
(2)How did first generation middle class blacks transfer their memories of the Civil Rights Movement to second and third generations?
and (3)How do subsequent generations measure their individual achievement against civil rights gains?
Drawing from both frame analysis and collective memory theories, this study reveals how ideologies around race and class get created, transformed, and transferred among this group. The analysis of this research is based on primary data from fifty-two first, second and third generation middle class blacks from Chicago, Illinois.
First generation respondents had either participated in or were knowledgeable of civil rights activities before the ratification of civil rights legislation, and entered the middle class at the end of the movement.
Second and third generation respondents were not involved in civil rights projects, and were the beneficiaries of their parents' status. At the core of my research lies the assumption that collective memory never loses relevance to traditionally oppressed groups, but the content of the memory is often altered to produce different perspectives of the same occurrence. In my work, cohorts of my study framed their memories of civil rights projects either through direct experience or fabricated narratives. While first generation cases tended to hold an intimate memory of the Civil Rights Movement, subsequent generations were offered appropriated narratives that centered on civil rights outcomes that included attending integrated schools, working in mainstream careers, patronizing white businesses, and worship and recreation in integrated environments. As a result of the selective narrative of their parents or other acquaintances impacted by the movement, second and third generation cases reflect differently upon the significance and necessity of civil rights legislation, the middle class' responsibility to the black underclass, and the social interaction between blacks and whites.

Ссылки:
http://wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations/sear...